How Introverts Who Sell Can Rev Up Sales by Slowing Down

Just as Nixon enacted Auto Speed Reduction Day for energy conservation in 1973, introverts in business who sell may want to declare their own Sales Speed Reduction day for energy conservation. Extroverts, more like solar powered items, continually and speedily energize by doing things.

How Introverts Who Sell Can Rev Up Sales by Slowing Down

Extroverts, more like solar powered items, continually and speedily energize by doing things. Introverts, more like

Introverts, more like flashlights, need to stop and replace batteries to keep on going.

How Introverts Who Sell Can Rev Up Sales by Slowing Down

 

1. Sales and marketing plans usually include a degree of networking. Introverts-Who-Sell-Can-Rev-Up-Sales

Be selective about the events you attend. Having an “A” in INTJ in Myers-Briggs types, I usually go early and speak with three to six people and then I’m free to either sit and eat, just wander around or leave. Selectivity and purposeful introductions are key to my success.

2. Schedule your days around your preferences.

Any extroverting – speaking engagements, networking, even one to one meetings – gets best results done after you have some quiet time before and after. Allow time to pace yourself. In particular, you want any activity that restores and refreshes you. Selling can be enjoyable this way!

 

3. Email is a great way of communicating for introverts. Email-is-a-great-way-of-communicating-for-introverts

You can control the conversation with more of a comfort level. Don’t hesitate to draft an introduction or follow-up email and let it sit in draft mode. Then before you “speak” you’ve satisfied that innate need to think first.

4. Maximize your planning side to minimize crunch time.

If you start preparing for a sales presentation or making a proposal well before the deadline, this lets you manage both time and energy.

If you start preparing for a sales presentation or making a proposal well before the deadline, you’ll have better control of both time and energy.

5. Remember that introversion can look like shyness, but it isn’t.

Professor Bernardo Carducci of the Shyness Institute at Indiana University defines the difference this way: an introvert hangs around the edge of a social or business event to preserve their energy; a shy person is reluctant to join in because of the risk being judged.

I bet you think about it you would find you know extroverts and introverts who are shy!

understanding-introverts-extroverts6. Understand yourself as an introvert.

Since we need more time to restore our energy, select enough speed reduction activities to protect your energy. Maybe this means meditating, or getting some alone time in nature or getting settled in your favorite chair to read a book. Hire a coach for both ideas and accountability, if necessary, one who understands the introvert’s care.

No one is solely introverted or extroverted. Being an introvert in sales doesn’t mean there is something that you have to fix. There’s nothing broken. We’re in the perfect position as introverts to do more ‘being’ instead of ‘doing.’ The truth is even extroverts may find it stimulating to slow down on occasion.

 

Being an introvert in sales doesn’t mean there is something that you have to fix. There’s nothing broken. We’re in the perfect position as introverts to do more ‘being’ instead of ‘doing.’ The truth is even extroverts may find it stimulating to slow down on occasion.

We’re in the perfect position as introverts to do more ‘being’ instead of ‘doing.’ The truth is even extroverts may find it stimulating to slow down on occasion.

The truth is even extroverts may find it stimulating to slow down on occasion.

Find your voice in everyday business situations

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For introverts who communicate and extroverts who want to understand them.

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This post originally published Jan 5, 2009, and titled Sales-Tip-Introvert-Salespeople-Celebrate-Speed-Reduction-Day-to-Rev-up-Sales

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Comments

  1. Great suggestions that can rev up sales for both extroverts and introverts. Wasting time on networking events that will not generate anything worth while is never a good idea. No matter how extrovert you are you are better off using your time in a more productive way.

    When it comes to getting more energy all of us need to relax and carry out activities that restore us. If not, we will, like so many extroverts who do to much end up burnt out.

    By the way, those of you who have not yet read Patricia’s latest book will benefit from doing so.
    catarina.alexon recently posted…Do you like Harvard’s new approach to leadership?My Profile

  2. Great post, Patrica! I love that you mention “Maximize your planning side to minimize crunch time”. I do notice that creativity is hard to come by when I am too close to the deadline date. I rather set it up right away and then contemplate and modify and then within the last few days really memorize and work on the final presentation.
    Sabrina Quairoli recently posted…7 Book Storage Solutions For Small SpacesMy Profile

  3. Great tips. This article was like holding up a mirror. I functioned better when I acted in the manners listed. It is important to understand ourselves well enough to know what we need to conserve our energy and succeed.

  4. I find I’m more trusting of an introvert sales person than an extravert. I appreciate a sales person who is not aggressive, who is willing to move at a slower pace. Maybe because I’m an introvert myself I react badly to people who come on too strong.

  5. Pat, I really appreciate how you remind us that introvertedness (is that a word?) doesn’t necessarily equate to shyness. That has been really helpful in my understanding people of few words.
    Doreen Pendgracs recently posted…hot on the trail of the best Nanaimo Bar experienceMy Profile

  6. Patricia — I’m an extrovert but I, too, am selective at networking events. My goal is to make 1-2 connections to follow up on. It’s too exhausting to “work the room.” You tense up trying to meet all the “right people.” After all, networking events are supposed to be fun, too.

  7. My chapter of the NFAA had a speaker last week who gave some tips for book marketing for introverts. Most of the nearly 20 people there were surprised at the explanation of how shyness is different from introversion, but appreciated learning the difference. The speaker said the most difficult thing to be is a shy extrovert, and I may agree since I think I know one now.

  8. Introverts come up trumps again! Being an introvert is often viewed as a negative trait. You are perceived as being shy and awkward when this is not the case. Why is loudness acquainted with confudence/boldness and quietness with a lack of confidence?

    Introvert and extroverts have something to offer – we can embrace both character traits.
    Phoenicia recently posted…Is integrity becoming a thing of the past?My Profile

  9. When I was still in the workforce I used to have to attend conferences and like you, I would take the time to meet the people I wanted to meet (and knew beforehand who they were) and then often I would just head to my room and work on some papers. I tried the ‘meet and greet’ thing once and it was completely exhausting and actually demoralizing.
    lenie recently posted…Organic Food Label – What’s Valid, What’s NotMy Profile

  10. I find this really interesting. I am an introvert who has always done really well at sales. And most of my sales experience has been over the phone. And I’ve always felt energized while talking to clients or potential clients over the phone. However, I dread making calls in my real life. I have to push myself to call even to make appointments because I find it draining, (at least in theory. It might not be that bad once I’m actually talking.) So you never know where you might thrive if you don’t push yourself to take a chance. (I only tried sales in my early days as an actress because I was desperate to find a job that provided flexibility for auditions.)
    Erica recently posted…10 Daily Practices for Health & Weight LossMy Profile

  11. Fantastic tips Patricia! I think the most germane, for me, is #6. It helps if you are aware that you are an introvert, and then set some guidelines for yourself to accommodate that. Which, is of course, all of the points you mentioned here.
    Jacqueline Gum recently posted…A Break For Where’s The JusticeMy Profile

  12. Great post Patricia. I’m a person who needs my quiet time, but enjoy enriching my calendar with social events. I agree with your point on being selective at networking events, because it’s about the strength of the connections you form versus collecting 100+ business cards with no intention of initiating meaningful interactions. Thanks for sharing.

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